Episode 28. Interview with Ian Kuali'i

Ian Kuali`i’s creative process is "The meditative process of destroying to create". Blending the contrasting elements of loose Urban Contemporary techniques with detailed hand cut paper to manifest unique compositions, Ian Kuali'i's work is a balance between the rough and delicate while exploring ideas of modern progress dependent on a foundation in one’s own history. His art is influenced by his ancestral ties to the Southwest United States and Hawaii, as well as esoteric symbolism, mysticism, global politics and themes of urban decay.

More about the artist:

Hand cut paper element of the work in progress for the National Museum of Mexican Art. Ian Kuali'i

Hand cut paper element of the work in progress for the National Museum of Mexican Art. Ian Kuali'i

Ian Kuali'i's formative years in Southern California exposed him to the Hip Hop culture of the 80’s and later influenced his teenage years growing up on the Island of Maui. Of Hawaiian, Apache, English and Jewish ancestry, Ian found his place among his peers and soon became one of the pioneers of graffiti and mural art on Maui under the name of Jedi. On Maui, Ian worked on a number of mural projects where his colorful aerosol paint designs and images can be seen on the canvas walls of community youth centers and skate board parks.  Ian has apprenticed to artist Doze Green, one of the pioneers of Hip Hop culture who has made his claim in the Fine Arts world, and is a featured artist in a number of solo and group shows spanning the U.S. from Hawai`i to New York. Ian is currently living and working as an artist in New Jersey. -Kua'aina Accociates
Follow Ian Kuali'i at www.iankualii.com

Portrait of James 'Bluster' Alicea

Portrait of James 'Bluster' Alicea

Newark Ave. Portrait of Taco AKA Tick Tock. Ian Kuali'i

Newark Ave. Portrait of Taco AKA Tick Tock. Ian Kuali'i

12' x 7' floating hand cut paper piece in the window of the de Young Museum's Kimball Gallery titled "Nove Lux". Ian Kuali'i

12' x 7' floating hand cut paper piece in the window of the de Young Museum's Kimball Gallery titled "Nove Lux". Ian Kuali'i